The Cult + Bad Sav – 19/11/16 – Town Hall, Dunedin

 

The Cult? In Dunedin?  The actual Cult? Messrs Astbury and Duffy? In the Town Hall you say? Jebus. This town sucks for musical entertainment most of the time, but occasionally, just occasionally, the planets align and a promoter somewhere manages to convince a half decent act to venture down south. This year alone we’ve had The Buzzcocks and Black Sabbath, now The Cult.

Now then. The Cult. I love The Cult. I fucking love The Cult. Well, to be precise, I love the 4 or 5 albums they recorded in the 80s. I couldn’t even tell you the name of anything released since then. However, I get the suspicion that they know what the people want, the likelihood of them playing the classics is fairly high. Sure they’ll play a couple of new ones but I’m hanging out for half a dozen from the 80s and I’ll be happy with that.

There’s also the novelty factor of going to a gig in Dunedin Town Hall.  It’s a fine old building, which I’ve only seen the inside of once in 11 years of living here. That was a classical gig me and Mrs ByTor got free tickets for. I had no idea they were open to hosting rock gigs.

I’ve just re-read my review of them in 1989, (almost twenty fucking seven years ago to the day!) and it wasn’t too complimentary. My main gripe (apart from Wembley Arena’s fuckawful sound) was Ian Astbury’s voice. If I remember correctly he just seems to sing half the words, struggling to hold a note for longer than half a breath. Anyway, it’s not reason enough for me to turn my nose up at it.

Apparently there is a support act, Bad Sav, a local bunch who I’ve seen a few times before. I was too busy in the bar while they were on though. Pretty big gig for them though, there seemed to be quite a few people watching them.

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The Cult, Dunedin Town Hall 2016

The Town Hall is maybe 3/4 full, which is really surprising given the fact that it appears to have been a word-of-mouth gig, such was the scarcity of promotion. I didn’t see or hear a single ad, apart from Facebook. Is that all that you need these days though? The house lights duly go down at about 9:30, and on they saunter to a very enthusiastic reception. Wild Flower is just about the best opening track for any album, and it’s an absolute pearler to open a gig. The opening riff, as brazenly stolen from AC/DC as anything Airbourne have ever done, is just legendary. It’s one of those songs that just can’t be played too loud. The sound in the Town Hall is really good, and it’s REALLY loud. My earplugs are only just up to the task of protecting my ‘drums. Not sure if the band brought this PA with them, I’m pretty sure Strawberry Sound doesn’t have anything this big. Crystal clear too.

Astbury is, as I remember from last time, struggling to stretch the notes out to their intended length, and in places this grates slightly, but he’s bang in tune and there are a couple of thousand black-clad fans singing along to help him anyway. Duffy though, is a guitar hero of the first order. He is looking pretty good for his 50 odd years, and man can he play that fucking thing. He is the consummate pro, stuffed full of clichés, but so fucking cool with it. I would even go so far as to say he’s up there with Angus Young. The rockstar pose on the cover of Sonic Temple is not affected, it’s just the way he plays the guitar. I expect he strikes that pose when he’s washing the car or mowing the lawn, he’s that fucking rock and roll. There are some other musicians on the stage, no idea about the bassist or rhythm guitar/keyboardist (they do the job), but the drummer is John Tempesta (ex-Exodus and Testament, amongst many others) so I’ve probably seen him a few times before without realising. He’s more than capable of backing the Astbury & Duffy show, but it really is just that, the other three may as well be session musicians for all the spotlight time they get.

Fucking guitar hero of the highest order
Billy Duffy, axe hero (pic copyright Hadden Gamble 2016)

As I (and probably a couple of thousand others) had hoped, there is a healthy amount of 80s material tonight. They play a few new ones, none of which I’m familiar with, and they offer a good opportunity to sneak to the bar. They’re not bad, they’re just not Electric . So, as well as Wild Flower we get Lil’ Devil, Rain, Phoenix, Horse Nation, Sweet Soul Sister & Firewoman, and then after only 90 very short minutes, the set winds up with the absolutely epic She Sells Sanctuary. We drag them back on stage for one more – there is one classic that they can’t leave without playing, and that’s Love Removal Machine. And that’s all folks. Short but oh so sweet (90 mins isn’t really short, it’s just that Steven Wilson played for three whole hours last month!).

I was expecting my favourite songs tonight to be those from Electric and earlier, but I think I enjoyed Firewoman and Sweet Soul Sister the most. I didn’t particularly like Sonic Temple when it came out, but it’s somewhat grown on me over the last 25 years(!). Duffy was putting much more in the way of bended-knee-facial-contortion guitar solos on Sonic Temple than he ever had on Love, or even Electric, and those two tracks tonight gave him more of an opportunity to do his thang. And he does his thang with absolute note for note precision, faithful to the recorded version, exactly as it was laid down 27 years back. No ten minute improvised shredding behind his head á la Angus Young or Nigel Tufnell while the others go off for a toilet break. One word – legendary.

In case any Kiwis reading this thought Ian Astbury was from California, he’s not. He hails from the north-west of England. If you listen to Dreamtime Live at the Lyceum (recorded in 1984), he was definitely still a Scouser! By contrast, Mr Duffy, who presumably has spent roughly the same time across the Atlantic as him over the last three decades, hasn’t shed his native twang at all. I’ve always wondered if Astbury’s accent shift was just an affectation or if ‘American’ has just unconsciously consumed him since moving to LA. I am told that I have traces of a Kiwi accent these days (after 11 years living in NZ), and that is despite my attempts to resist it…

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Black Sabbath + Rival Sons – Forsyth Barr Stadium, Dunedin – 30/04/16

So I’m finally going to the Forsyth Barr stadium to see a concert. The giant fucking rugby stadium that we didn’t need. The white elephant that Dunedin ratepayers didn’t even want. I whinged and moaned about it at the start, but I’m finally coming to terms with the fact that it’s here to stay, so I might as well use the fucking thing.

I’ve been there half a dozen times before (Rugby World Cup, Football World Cup qualifying tournaments, Wellington Phoenix, Beer Festivals etc) and it’s all very nice and everything, but I’ve never been there for a gig. I’ve never been that tempted by the music on offer to stump up the $150+ necessary to see it. What have we had over the 4 years since it was opened? Elton John, Aerosmith, Fleetwood Mac, Paul Simon & Tom Jones. Not my all time list of must-see artists (although I have actually seen all of them except Fleetwood Mac before, but that’s irrelevant). But I’ll go and see Sabbath. Even at $170 I’ll go and see Sabbath. Even though the sound at Forsyth Barr is legendarily poor (to the point where it’s been said that it sounds better from Logan Park than in the actual stadium). Even though I have gone on record as saying that these days I’m only going to fork out big bucks on bands I’ve never seen before. Even though this is going to be probably the most expensive gig I’ve ever seen. Yup, I’m going.

I bought the ticket 4 months ago. It’s been pinned up on my noticeboard, glaring at me and shouting “$170? You could have bought your kids a couple of pair of shoes each for that” or “$170? That’s 17 high-end craft beers from New World” or “$170? That’s four times as much as the total face value of tickets from all previous times you’ve seen Black Sabbath”. I think only Madonna in 2004 (£100 !?) was actually more expensive than this, but that was back in the days of being unshackled by mortgage and children.

So, money concerns aside, the day is finally here, and tonight I’M GOING TO SEE BLACK SABBATH!! The greatest metal band of all time, if the ads for the concert are to be believed. They’ve certainly been a fairly big part of my life since 1987 or so. Legends, in fact. It’s just Ozzy, Geezer and Tony these days, but to be honest I think the position of drummer  (and no disrespect to Bill Ward here) is the easiest to swap out for some random session dude. It’s not like replacing Neil Peart in Rush, for instance. It’s going to be good, for sure.

The atmosphere in and around Forsyth Barr is electric. Hordes of black clad fans of all ages are milling around, and the crowd is not nearly as male dominated as you would expect of a metal gig. Like at the Buzzcocks a few weeks ago, there are a lot of strange hairy characters here that you just don’t see round and about town normally. Where do they hide? Quite an encouraging number of younger people too. I mean, Sabbath’s best records were made before I was born. Slightly disappointed by the turnout though – only half the stadium is being used – there is temporary seating on the halfway line and quite a lot of space at the back of the pitch but most of the seats look occupied. At a rough guess maybe 8-10 thousand? C’mon Dunedin, you should do better than this

rivalsonsRival Sons is the support act, not someone I’d ever heard of, but a prior bit of research on Spotify revealed them to be a pretty decent blues rock outfit from Long Beach, with only a couple of albums under their belts. They are very good in person, sort of dirty Black Crowes end of the blues rock spectrum, with more than a passing resemblance to Zeppelin. The most striking thing about them (and unfortunately my Nokia Lumia’s camera can’t do justice to this) is the beard on the tambourine/keyboard/pedal steel player. It’s a chinmuff of ZZ Top proportions, this guy could easily pass off as an Amish. I even recognise two of their songs from my brief Spotify session earlier in the day. Or maybe I recognise them from Houses Of The Holy. Difficult to tell…

sabAnd so to business. After a quick trip to the bar it’s time for the main course. Lights down, volume up and here we go. The crowd noise is fantastic as the video screen shows some flashy animation of dragons and fire and other metal clichés. The (almost) septuagenarian metal gods wander out of the shadows to the sound of a lone church bell, and this means only one thing. Black Sabbath. They’re opening with their eponymous signature tune, the heaviest, most evil, sinister riff ever written. It’s so simple, just three notes, not even chords, and it’s basically the riff that gave birth to heavy metal, nearly half a century ago. It’s probably my favourite Sabbath tune and they smash it out of the park. My fears of poor acoustics are entirely unfounded, and I don’t even need my ear plugs – it’s just about as good a sound as you could wish for in a stadium. A procession of the greatest of greatest hits then streams forth – Snowblind, After Forever, Faeries Wear Boots, Behind The Wall Of Sleep, War Pigs, Children of the Grave, Iron Man etc etc. I’m sure they’re very proud of their latest album but they don’t go anywhere near it. In fact, I don’t think they venture much later than about 1972, which is fine by me. More than fine. I know every note of every song they play and it is all FUCKING BRILLIANT. All of it. Even Tommy Clufeto’s monster drum solo (he’s way way more of a showman than Bill Ward). I’m not normally one for big solos but I am exhausted just watching this guy, the sheer effort he is putting into hitting ALL of his drums as LOUD and as FAST as he can deserves applause, which it duly gets, and lots.ozzy

And then the highpoint of the evening, as Ozzy yells at us ‘WE LOVE YOU AUCKLAND!’ If it were anyone else, I think I’d be more than a little offended, but as it’s Ozzy, and it’s such a, well, Ozzy thing to do, we’ll let it pass with a wry smile. What the fuck must he have been like at the height of his excesses though?

Then it’s good night Dunedin, you’ve been amazing, see you later. And off they trudge so we can play the encore game. You know you’re coming back on. We know you’re coming back on. You know we know you’re coming back on. And they come back on and surprise surprise, it’s for a single encore, Paranoid. It’s a great song, and a great way to round off an all too short night.

theendI wonder if it really is the end? It’s certainly not their first farewell tour, and if the bank balances run dry again, I wouldn’t bet against seeing them coming out of retirement. Sad to see them go, but it’s probably for the best. Either way, they have done immense things in music. They almost single handedly invented an entire genre of music for fuck’s sake, you can’t get more immense than that.

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